Glam Paddling in Long Beach

Kayaking the Naples Canals in Long Beach

Sea kayaking doesn’t get any more glamorous than paddling the storybook canals around Long Beach’s Naples Island! You thread your way through calm waterways surrounded by luxury homes and snazzy vessels. You slide beneath arched bridges. You can sidle right up to a quiet beach or a waterside eatery. And did we mention moon jellies?

The adventure begins at Kayaks on the Water on Alamitos Bay Beach, a beautiful strip of sand just opposite Naples. They rent single and double kayaks (SUPs too), and offer quick lessons for beginners. From the push-off point, cross over toward the island to enter circular Rivo Alto Canal and float along, enjoying the homes and the fanciful boat names.

Keep your eyes out for the stingless moon jellies that float along the water’s surface. Once you exit the canal, go back the way you came and continue past Kayaks on the Water to further explore Alamitos Bay.

Paddling clockwise, you can stroke your way underneath the East Second Street Bridge and the Appian Way Bridge to reach Mother’s Beach. Park your kayak on the sand and head to Mom’s Beach House Café, a local favorite for breakfast, brunch, and burgers. You’ll literally be stoked to complete your loop around the bay!

Kayaks on the Water is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Rentals are $10/hour.

From the north: Take I-405 to the Studebaker Rd. exit and head south toward the ocean on Studebaker Rd. Continue 4.2 miles and turn right on E. 2nd St. Continue 1.6 miles and turn left on Bay Shore Ave., followed by a quick left on 54th Pl.

From the south: Take CA-22 to the Studebaker Rd. exit and head south toward the ocean on Studebaker Rd. Continue 1.2 miles and turn right on E. 2nd St. Continue 1.6 miles and turn left on Bay Shore Ave., followed by a quick left on 54th Pl.

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